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The following information is taken from Unlocking Essex. Most of the following photos are from the website of Images of England at default are are the copyright of the following photographers - Mr A Gude, Mr P Herring, Mr A Taylor and Mr Peter Warwick.

muddy street
St Mary's Church 1901 - The clock was commissioned for the Golden Jubilee of Queen Victoria. Church of St Mary the Virgin Church at Henham was mentioned in a will of 1044-45. The chancel is early 13th century, c1290 a south transept was added to the nave. The church was restored in the 19 century but has been little altered.

A mainly C13 and C14 church which has escaped much later alteration. A flint and stone church comprising an early C13 chancel, a C14 nave, with a south aisle of circa 1300, developed from a late C13 south transept, and a west tower of circa 1325. The tower is of 3 stages with diagonal buttresses, a later brick battlemented parapet and small lead spire. The chancel has some lancet windows. The second column of the north arcade has a fine carving of the Virgin and Child with censing angels. The north arcade also has the carving of a leopard's head and a dragon. The south porch is of the C15, with carved spandrels to the entrance archway and roof braces. The interior fittings include a fine C15 octagonal font carved with shields, a high C15 chancel screen and a fine C15 hexagonal pulpit carved with small buttresses, pinnacles and traceried panels. There is an C18 monument to Samuel Feake, Chairman of the East India Company and Governor of Fort William (d. 1757). The church occupies an important position in the village centre which stands at the west end of the present village. Graded for its architectural, historical and topographical value.
Church
Apple Tree Cottage, THE ROW, C 18-C19 timber-framed and plastered building.  One storey and attics. Two window range of double-hung sashes with vertical glazing bars.  A central doorway has a trellis porch.  Roof thatched, half hipped at the east end. appletree cottage
Bacons, Crow Street - C16-C17 timber-framed and plastered house with the framing exposed on the east front.  Restored in the C20.  Two storeys. Three window range leaded casements.  Roof tiled, with one central and one end chimney stack (rebuilt with old bricks).  The interior has exposed timber-framing, beams and ceiling joists and there is a good Tudor plaster fireplace surround.  bacons
Bacons Cottage, Crow Street - C18-C19 timber-framed and plastered building.  Two storeys. Modern casement windows.  Roof thatched, half hipped at the east end. bacons cottage
Bays Cottage, High Street - Originally a range of C17-C18 timber - framed and plastered cottages, now one tenement.  One storey and attics.  Casement windows with glazing bars. Roof thatched, half-hipped at the east end, with 5 dormer windows and 2 central chimney stacks.

 

bays cottage

Bedwell Common 4679- 2 trial trenches made following field walking and Romano-British occupation of the 2nd and 3rd centuries was established. <1> RB surface scatter found in 1972 and 1973 suggested the possibility of a site worth excavating. Trial excavations undertaken by T A Betts for the M11 Archaeological Committee (central section). The site lay on the 300ft contour, sloped towards the east and in the north west corner of the field is a spring which flows to the open field boundary ditch c40m north of the trial trenches. Iron nails and roof tiles suggested the site of a timber-framed building. Pottery indicated a 3rd century date though earlier occupation is not ruled out. <2> A letter from W J Wright has a plan of the site with locations of the 3 sites excavated. All the sites were similar, consisting of a pebble floor with pieces of bone in contact with it and large flints scattered about on top of this, embedded in black occupation soil. The soil contained nails, roofing tiles, grey ware. Site F1 had a single timber slot, site F3 a 5cm layer of red fill (iron ore), F2 a handle of an iron cleaver or similar. A sample of 'iron ore' was sent to P Reynolds. A machine trench on the west side showed 2 occupation sites of similar character to those excavated. They extended over 20m and 10m, up to half a metre deep in places. Site seems to be 4th century with Bromley Farm and Oxford wares. "Site is the one at Henham, TL 531282". On site F2 a box was opened 6.5m x 3m. The floor runs the full width and continues on the north and west sides. <3> Observation of works for the M11 Motorway led to the location and tracing of a ditch and 3 occupation sites with pebble floors of 4th century date. <4> Rescue excavations on the line of the M11 recovered evidence of 3 flint-floored structures of the 4th century, associated with iron-rich ore and iron objects. <5> <12> OS card and SMR, from M11 Field Officer's report for 1974, give finds up to 1975 as including oyster shells and a pudding stone quern. A fragment of flanged Roman roofing tile and a rim sherd of a large RB pot found on field investigation by OS but their was no concentration to indicate an occupation site. <6> <9> <10> Site TL52-088 appears to be part of the same settlement. A newspaper article gives finds, some of which have been mentioned above. NGR given in SMR as TL 532285. An RB settlement c100m square had been uncovered by 1978. 6 areas of occupation, pits and ditches had been found. No structural evidence other than roofing tile and timber nails. Each site had a cobble floor overlaid with a mix of soil, charcoal, lumps of stone. Iron finds included a cleaver handle, a 4cm diameter ring and sandal studs or hob nails. Other finds: a child's open bracelet, bronze, a few poor coins. Sections of 2 querns found, each c0.75m diameter. A pit inside the ditches contained many cattle bones. A black layer was over each site, suggesting use of fire for pottery or iron working. "The overall picture is one of a small communal settlement situated near to a spring, in a hollow with an open aspect to the south". <7> <8>

COBBLED SURFACE (Dated 43AD to 409AD), COBBLED SURFACE (Dated 43AD to 409AD), SETTLEMENT (Dated 43AD to 409AD), SETTLEMENT (Dated 43AD to 409AD), BUILDING (Dated 43AD to 409AD), BUILDING (Dated 43AD to 409AD), DITCH (Dated 43AD to 409AD), DITCH (Dated 43AD to 409AD), PIT (Dated 43AD to 409AD), PIT (Dated 43AD to 409AD)

FINDS -
BRONZE BRACELET (Dated 300AD To 400AD), IRON CLEAVER (Dated 300AD To 400AD), METAL COIN (Dated 43AD To 409AD), IRON HOB NAIL (Dated 43AD To 409AD), IRON NAIL (Dated 200AD To 300AD),m SHELL OYSTER SHELL (Dated 200AD To 400AD), STONE QUERN (Dated 200AD To 400AD), IRON RING (Dated 300AD To 400AD), IRON STUD (Dated 300AD To 400AD), POTTERY VESSEL (Dated 200AD To 400AD)

Bedwell Common 4680- Possible Saxon pottery. 410AD to 1065AD Early Medieval

Bell Cottage and Rose Cottage, HIGH STREET,  pair of late C18 or early C19 timber-framed and plastered houses.  Two storeys. Two window range, double-hung sashes with glazing bars. Roofs slate, with a central chimney stack.

beel and rose cottages
Bird's Farmhouse & Barn, Church End - early C17 timber-framed and plastered building.  Two storeys. The upper storey is jettied on the south front and there is a later lean-to addition at the east end.  Two window range, mainly casements. Roof tiled, hipped at the east and west ends.
bird's farm
birds farm barn
Blossom Hill Farm 46536 - FIELD BOUNDARY (Dated 1066AD to 1539AD). Cropmarks of former field boundaries, visible on 1st edition OS mapping
Cedar Cottage, CROW STREET - Cl8-C19 timber-framed and plastered cottage.  Two storeys.  Two window range, casements with glazing bars.  A gabled porch projects on the front. Roof thatched, half hipped, with a central chimney stack and one end external stack at the north end. cedar cottage
Nos 2 and 3, Church Cottages, CHURCH STREET - C18 timber-framed and plastered building built on an L shaped plan with a short wing extending to the north at the west end.  Two storeys.  Three: one window range.  Nos 2 and 3 have casements with glazing bars.  Boarded doors. Roofs tiled, hipped on the wing, with 2 central chimney stacks. church cottages
Church Cottages, CHURCH STREET - Range of C17 timber-framed cottages refaced in galt brick in the C19.  A later timber-framed and plastered block, probably of the C18 is added at the rear. Two storeys.  Four window range, double-hung sashes with single vertical glazing bars, in plain reveals.  Roofs tiled.  The interior has exposed timber-framing. At the east end, in the roof, there is an area of plaster with a late C17 painting of the Lord's Prayer.  At one time there was the date 1686 or 1688, but this no longer remains. church cottage
Church Hall Church Hall
Cold War Nuclear Monitoring Post (dated 1959AD to 1968AD), Henham 46689 - A small compund alongside the footpath behind No.1 Carters lane. LOCKED. Externally the post is in good condition although all the paint has gone. Internally it is clean and free of vandalism. The olny furniture remaining is the cupboard and the wooden brackets for the table and shelf. Other items remaining including mattresses, light fittings and wiring, kitchen utensils and a few papers. ROYAL OBSERVER CORPS SITE (Dated 1959AD to 1968AD) Images are here




Coopers Hall Cottages HENHAM CROW STREET 1. 5222 (west side) Coopers Hall Cottages TL 5428 44/1254 12.4.79 II GV 2. Timber-framed and plastered house with C18 external features, possibly with an earlier frame. Two storeys. Three window range, (arranged 2:1) mainly double-hung sashes with glazing bars, some casements. Boarded doors. Roof thatched, half hipped at the north and south ends, with a central chimney stack. coopers hall cottage
Cornerway and Oakville, Crow Street - C18-C19 timber-framed and plastered cottages. Renovated in the C20, but retaining much of the local vernacular character. One storey and attics. Small casement windows. Roof tiled, half hipped at the north-east and south-west ends, with 2 sloping roofed dormer windows and 2 chimney stacks (one central). cornerway and oakville
Datchet Mead, High Street - C18-C19 timber-framed and plastered cottage. Renovated in the C20. One storey and attics. Casement windows. Roof thatched, half hipped, with a modern central swept dormer window, and a central chimney stack. datchet mead
Dolls Cottage, The Row - C17 timber-framed and plastered building mainly one storeyed and attics with a 2 storeyed part at the west end, with a jettied upper storey. Casement windows. Roof thatched, with 2 dormer windows. At a later date "Dolls Cottage" was joined to "Thatch End" by an infil bay between the main blocks. dolls cottage
Down Hall House, north of - 4706 POTTERY VESSEL (dated 43AD To 409AD). Samian from field drains and other possible Roman finds. In Saffron Walden Museum
Elm Cottage, PLEDGDON GREEN - C18 timber-framed and plastered cottage. One storey and attics. Casement windows. Roof tiled, half hipped, with one gabled dormer window. elm cottage
Elsenham Place - C16-C17 timber-framed and plastered house. Cabled wings extend at the east and west ends of the north front. The east wing also extends to the south at the rear with exposed timber-framing on the west side. The gabled wings on the north front are jettied on the first storey. The house was renovated in the C20, with panels of ornamental pargetting. Two storeys and attics. The windows are modern casements with ornamental leaded lights. Roofs tiled. The interior has some woodwork which came from The Close, High Street, Saffron Walden, when it was demolished in 1937, and a wood overmantle which came from Beaufort House, Chelsea elsneham place
Elsenham Place - barns to west of Elsenham Place fronting road TL 52 NW 22/249 II GV 2. An L-shaped range of C17 and C18 timber-framed and weather-boarded barns, with some plaster on the west side. Roofs tiled. A large C17 barn extends to the east and west with a half hipped roof and C18 barns extends to the south at the west end. There are gabled entrance bays on the east, west and south sides. elsenham place barns
Elsenham Place - Dovecote to south-west of Elsenham Place TL 52 NW 22/250 26.11.51 II GV 2. C17 square timber-framed dovecote with a brick base, a weather-boarded plinth and plastered above. A pyramid tiled roof is surmounted by an open cupola with a small pyramid tiled roof. The interior has the original nesting boxes. dovecote elsenham place
Elsenham Quarry, Roman features 46756 - Early Roman and Late Roman field boundaries and probably settlement (pits). Trial trenching in advance of quarrying revealed a large number of Iron Age and Roman features. Late Iron Age settlement enclosures (very partially preserved under later features), pits, possibly pottery manufacture. <1> Early Roman and Late Roman field boundaries and probably settlement (pits).

FIELD BOUNDARY (Dated 43AD to 409AD), SETTLEMENT (Dated 43AD to 409AD), ENCLOSURE (Dated 100BC to 42AD), PIT (Dated 100BC to 42AD)

Finds - POTTERY VESSEL (Dated 43AD To 409AD), POTTERY VESSEL (Dated 100BC To 42AD)
Forres Cottage, CHURCH STREET - C17 timber-framed and plastered house of 2 storeys with a lower wing of one storey and attics to the west. The main block has 2 window range, double-hung sashes with glazing bars and a central gabled porch. The wing has leaded casements. Roofs tiled. The main block is hipped at the east and west ends and steeply pitched, with an original hexagonal shafted chimney stack on a large square base at the west end. forres
Friars Cottage, CHURCH END - C17 timber-framed and plastered house. Restored. One storey and attics. Small casement windows with lattice leaded lights. Roof thatched, with 2 dormers and an original central chimney stack with 2 octagonal shafts. friars cottage
Gardeners Cottage, Henham Road - Gardeners Cottage TL 52 NW 22/1113 II GV 2. C16-C17 timber - framed and plastered house with some weather-boarding. Two storeys. Casement windows. Roof tiled, half - hipped at the east and west ends. A C20 addition projects on the front, with a weather-boarded front and a catslide roof above. gardenrs cottage
Gardeners Cottage, Henham Road - Range of thatched, timber-framed outbuildings, and barn to west of TL 52 NW 22/1114 Gardeners Cottage II GV 2. Range of C17-C18 timber-framed and weather-boarded outbuildings and barn with thatched roofs. barn
Glebe House, CROW STREET - Early-mid C19 brick front (painted) to a C17 timber-framed house. Most of the original frame remains. Two storeys. On the west front there is a central 2 storeyed canted bay with a modillion eaves cornice and, on the ground storey, a 6-panel door with moulded architrave, frieze and cornice. On each side of the bay there is a 2 window range of double-hung sashes with glazing bars. At the north end there is a single storeyed bay. The roof on the front is of slate and at the rear it is tiled. Wings extend to the east at the rear.
Glebeside Cottage, CARTER'S LANE - C17-C18 timber-framed and plastered cottage. One storey and attics. Small casement windows, some with leaded lights. Roof thatched, with 3 dormers and a central chimney stack. Glebeside Cottage
Great Hall Field - 4715 - Roman pottery and tile, recovered by metal detector users, was reported to Miss J Winmill and Mrs P Christie of Henham. They visited the area and identified 2 sites, 1 Roman, the other marked by medieval and later brick (see 4715, 4716 for other sites). The pottery was mostly abraded or too small for dating purposes. Pottery: 2 rim sherds (Oxfordshire products), one dated 240-400+ , the other 270-400+ . Miscellaneous fine ware sherds, oxidised, included a rim sherd of 3rd or 4th century date. Sherds in grey and black- burnished fabrics, in black wares these forms are thought to be dated post 120-130. Other sherds in coarse ware fabrics were dated mid 3rd-4th century and 2nd or 3rd century. Other finds: tegulae, floor and hypocaust tiles, tesserae, mortar, building stone, oyster shell and sandstone quern fragments. Coins: a bronze coin of Constantine II, a 4th century bronze coin, a commemorative issue of 330-7, bronze. The Roman site was previously unrecorded. <1> Quern fragments of a coarse grained red sandstone (stone to be identified). No original edge. One surface has well defined bi-directional grooving. The other surface is fairly rough. Maximum thickness 32mm. SMR states that the finds were observed in ploughsoil after autumn ploughing. <2> During the rescue excavation at 9960 an area on the hill slope was identified as having substantial quantities of Roman tile and pottery.On closer inspection an area approx. 20x20m was found to contain a substantial amount of large flints with mortar attached.Also visible were large patches of dark soil. These probably represent features being hit by the plough. The large quantity of roof tile compared to the flint would indicate a flint foundation with timber walls and tiled roof. Several tesserae were also recovered indicating the presence of a tile floor. <3> Site Assessment = Part of a building, probably a villa, forming part of a Roman estate.

FINDS - BRONZE COIN (Dated 317AD To 337AD), BRONZE COIN (Dated 300AD To 400AD), BRONZE COIN (Dated 330AD To 337AD, SHELL OYSTER SHELL (Dated 43AD To 409AD), STONE QUERN (Dated 43AD To 409AD), POTTERY VESSEL (Dated 200AD To 400AD), POTTERY VESSEL (Dated 43AD To 409AD)
great hall field
Greenend Farmhouse, 4725 - WOODEND GREEN - Late C16 1567AD to 1599AD Post Medieval timber-framed and plastered house. One storey and attics. A gabled wing extends on the east side and a modern addition on the west side. The windows are C20 casements with glazing bars. Roof tiled, half hipped at the north and south ends, with an original central chimney stack with 4 diagonal shafts. There are 3 gabled dormers on the west side and 2 on the east. The interior has good panelling dated 1589 and an original plaster fireplace ornamented with Tudor roses and fleur-de-lis. greenend farmhouse
Grind Hall, Henham geophysical Survey Report, 47258 - a detailed gradiometer survey conducted over 0.65hectares of pasture land at Grind Hall, henham. The survey identified two positive area anomalies and two positive linear anomalies were observed within the survey area. These may represent cut features such as ditches or pits of possible archaeological origin
Hall Barn,The Hall, HENHAM - circa 1600 timber-framed and weather-boarded aisled 5 bay barn. Roof tiled, old clay peg tiles, with "eyebrow" treatment of the eaves above the central entrances on the north and south sides.

Nearby, although no exact location is known, is a listed icehouse dated 1540 AD to 1900 AD
henham hall barn
Ham Cottage, WOODEND GREEN - small C18-C19 timber-framed and plastered building. One storey. Small casement windows. Roof thatched. There is a modern addition at the south end. Ham Cottage
Henham - no NGR, 47012 - Supporting arm brooch found by detectorists, grid reference unknown. Rare exaple in England. The brooch is an important addition to a small but important group of supporting-arm brooches which demonstrate immigration and/or trading links with North Germany during the middle to late fifth century. <1> Came to ECC for assessent via Harlow museum. NGR is for centre of Henham and is not exact.
Henham cropmarks of enclosure 46545 - Cropmarks (1066AD to 1539AD undetermined) of a rectangular enclosure with rounded corners 36m by 24m. There are no visible entrances or internal features on the available photography. Other cropmarks in the vicinity consist of a former field boundary to the north of the enclosure and a possible double ditched field boundary to the south. This feature is along the lines of a former field boundary visible on 1st edition OS mapping, but is not double ditched, but the feature has been classified as a field boundary rather than a trackway. This site could be connected to the reported Roman site 4658
Henham Hall - earthwork of deserted medieval village (DMV) between hall and church dated 1066-1539
Henham Hall - Icehouse, exact position not known 1540 - 1900. Plan and section of c.1820 in Essex Record Office
Henham Hall-Moat Homestead moat at ‘The Hall’, 200 yds north west of the church. Moat is water filled & in good condition. A rectangular homestead moat, original entrance across the east arm. Measures 64m overall east-west x ? north-south. An extension from the south west angle towards the south, 130m long x ? wide. Foundations of an earlier brick house found on the island when a house was erected in 1961. The Fitzwalters resided for some time at Henham Hall. Robert Fitzwalter born there in 1249. 'An account of the house is given in a 1530 survey. The manor house was built in the middle of a deer park, round a square court and it was entered by a brick and turreted 3-storied gatehouse. There was a 'fair chapel' with a 'quire', 50ft long x 20ft wide. ' - I'm certain that this report is not of Henham in Essex but of the Rous family home at Henham Park in Suffolk -RG.

It would seem that Robert Radcliffe rebuilt the manor within Henham Park between 1509 and 1530. The earliest reference to a park is in 1328. This source gives field names and discusses field boundaries that may represent the former park boundary. 'Of what happened to Henham Manor recorded in 1530 together with the buildings etc that went with it, we know nothing'. No cropmarks on AP's. Existing house believed to be post medieval, though suggestions have been made that part of the timberwork may be from the 1500's. Astonishing that a succession of important houses have vanished without trace.
Henham Hall - 4545 The house is 2-storied and timber-framed. Built in the 17th century on the site of the south arm of the moat. A low, modern wing added at the back. Pargetted plaster on the walls. One original chimney stack remains. Some original beams inside. <1> Considerably restored, not outstanding. <2> Photo in the SMR. <3> Probably originally a medieval hall house, altered and extended in the 17th century and later. Renovated in the 20th century. At the west end a cross-wing with a jettied upper storey. <4> Moated site (see 4544)
Henham House, CHURCH STREET - C18 timber-framed and plastered house. Two storeys. Five window range, double-hung sashes with glazing bars. A central 6-panel door with ornamental fanlight has a wood doorcase with an open pediment. Roof tiled, hipped at the east and west ends, with a coved plaster eaves cornice on the front. At the east end there is a later addition of one window range, with a lean-to slate roof. henham house
Henleys HIGH STREET - C18 timber-framed and plastered building. A panel over the door has the date 1750. Two storeys. Three window range of double-hung sashes with glazing bars. A central doorway has a cornice hood. Roof tiled, with end chimney stacks. At the rear there is a catslide roof to a low eaves level. henleys
Little Acre, CHURCH END - C17 timber-framed and plastered house with a cross wing at the south end. Renovated in the C20. Two storeys and attics. Small casement windows with lattice leaded lights (C20). A modern gabled porch projects on the front. Roof thatched, with one dormer window on the front. little acre
Little Henham, 19904 - Cropmark of possible moat. Rectangular enclosure, approx. 40mx30m. On earlier AP's shows as a slight earthwork
Little Henham Lodge 46365 - Possible enclosure and former field boundaries. Cropmarks of a possible enclosure. The rectangular enclosure is incomplete, but is at least 86m in length, with a possible pit at the south end. The cropmarks of a former field boundary, visible on 1st edition OS mapping is also visible to the west.
Little Henham Lodge Farmhouse - timber-framed and plastered building mainly of the C16 but with part of the frame of the late C15. Two storeys and attics. The windows are mostly casements (some double-hung sashes with glazing bars). There is a 2 storeyed staircase wing on the internal angle. Roof tiled. The interior has exposed timber-framing, ceiling beams and joists.

4634 - a Roman amphora was found here and exhibited to the Essex Field Club in 1887

4635 - Roman pottery, including Samian, and an iron adze found in 'Hall Field', Henham Lodge. IRON AXE (WEAPON) (Dated 43AD To 409AD) and POTTERY VESSEL (Dated 43AD To 409AD)<1> In 1891 Mrs R Cowell gave Saffron Walden Museum a fragment of Samian ware found in 1849 with other fragments comprising 2 nearly complete dishes, found in Hall Field, Henham Lodge. Also she gave an iron adze and the pedestal of a vase, apparently from Henham parish. They may have come, like the Samian fragment, from Henham Lodge, where the Cowells farmed for many years. This source gives references for 2 directories, in which the Cowells presumably appear. <2> <3> <4> The 'adze' is a shaft hole axe (with drooping blade). The samian was thrown into a pond and retrieved 14 years later when the pond was drained. <5> Two day excavation on construction site of Fishponds. Revealed Late Roman material. <6><7>
henham lodge
Little Henham Lodge - permanent grass meadow, still grazed, with uneven pattern on surface suggesting DMV, presumably the site of Little Henham.
Lodge Farm 40857 - Later C19 timber framed barn and brick built milking shed (1860AD to 1864AD) . The two historic buildings examined were clearly once part of a larger complex, although many of the associated buildings shown on historic maps have disappeared. Both the barn and the lesser milking shed are consistent in materials, style and form with a labourer’s cottage standing nearby, which displays a date-stone indicating construction in 1864. The barn is typically 19 century, though demonstrating a basic framing form and robustness more indicative of industrial warehouses. It clearly functioned in a more complex and versatile way than a traditional barn. The existing structure is aisled, with an upper floor occupying the central nave. Heavy lifting tackle and a subsidiary framework suggest the lifting and storage of heavy produce. The outer walls have been heavily modified, with partial loss and truncation on the west, while much of the original weatherboarding and roof materials have been replaced with corrugated sheet metal. In form, the barn demonstrates the transition between the pure framing tradition and the introduction of industrial methods, materials and engineering, in the use of occasional iron stanchions and complex bracing. The barn is also conspicuous for a quantity of Baltic marking, which allows the provenance of much of its timber to be confidently ascribed to the Hanseatic port of Danzig.The milking shed has survived in relatively poor condition, but has brick and roof form consistent with the date of the barn. Several external features such as windows remain, together with some functional dairy rooms, but few internal features have survived comprehensive refurbishment.
Lodge Cottages 46535 - FIELD BOUNDARY (Dated 1066AD to 1539AD). Cropmarks of former field boundaries, visible on 1st edition OS mapping, A small enclosure visible as a cropmark is probably a boundary of a former wood
Long Yards, Church End - C17 timber - framed and plastered building, originally 2 cottages, now one tenement. One storey and attics. Old iron casements with lattice leaded lights. Boarded doors. Roof thatched, with 4 swept dormers. The interior has exposed timber-framing, ceiling beams and joists, old boarded doors with iron fittings, original floorboards on the first floor and a brick long yards
Lovecott Farm 4704 - Shafthole adze (or 'perforated sandstone hammer') found while ploughing. Broken longitudinally-hour glass perforation. In PPS report classed as a mace but Fiona Roe would describe it as a shafthole adze. Found c1970. <1> Found in the fields of Lovecotes (or Lovecott Farm). It is of fine grade sandstone, dark grey-brown. It had been broken, probably by the ploughshare. It was submitted to Dr F S Wallis who reported: "A rather fine grained uniformly graded sandstone. The quartz grains are angular to subangular and unstrained, and are cemented by films of limonite. There are also many flakes of white mica and some almost opaque to deep red grains of haematite." The adze had been broken, probably by the ploughshare. It was 165mm long x 90mm broad x 40mm depth of perforation. Upper and lower faces are rounded, giving oval, section. The edge is straight and the implement would have had parallel faces. One face is slightly flattened. The hour glass perforation was drilled, partly from both sides, and is smooth and polished. The outside edge shows signs of wear on one face only. The polish round the waisted part of the shaft hole could be taken to indicate wear from a haft. Signs of damage are no doubt connected with the breaking of the implement. Little obvious sign of wear on the intact end. Probably late neolithic in date. <2> Is No E43 in Clough and Green's List of East Anglian implement petrology. Classed here as a 'mace'. <3> Called a 'shafthole adze' by Fiona Roe. <4> Drawings and photographs in the SMR
Mill Farm - site of windmill. Dated 1540AD to 1900AD.

Find by Mr J.R Brett, of a flint arrowhead dated 500000BC to 42AD Prehistoric, at Easter 1992, in plough soil close to the footpath from Elsenham to the site of Henham hill, along the line of the old railway. The arrowhead measures approximately 30mm along the base and 20mm base to tip, formed from a single flake of flint found locally. In form it is closest to British Oblique type e. There is some plough damage to the edges and the tip is broken. The base is shaped to facilitate attatchment to the shaft of an arrow
Mondis, CROW STREET - C17 timber-framed house with exposed timber-framing and plaster infil. Built on an L shaped plan. Partly 2 storeys and partly one storey and attics. Casement windows with leaded lights. Roof tiled, with hipped and half-hipped ends. Three modern gabled dormer windows.

mondis

Mount House, CHURCH STREET - C17 timber-framed and plastered house considerably altered in the C18. Two storeys and attics. Three window range, 3-light casement windows with glazing bars (C20). The doorway has a wood doorcase with plain pilasters, decorated frieze and cornice. Roof tiled, half hipped at the east and west ends, with one modern dormer window on the front and a central large square chimney stack. mount house
No 1 THE ROW C17-C18 timber-framed and plastered building, formerly a range of cottages, now one tenement. Renovated. One storey and attics. Casement windows (some with leaded lights). Roof thatched, with 3 dormers on the front. 1 the row
No 1 Coopers Hall Cottage, CROW STREET - Early C19 timber-framed and plastered house. Two storeys. Three window range, double-hung sashes with glazing bars. The doorway has an architrave and flat hood. Roof slate, hipped at the south end.
Old Mead, OLD MEAD ROAD 4727 - Possible moated enclosure at Old Mead shown on Henham Tithe map c1840. C17 timber-framed and plastered house. Two storeys. A central 2 storeyed porch wing projects on the front, with a hipped tiled roof. Six window range, arranged 2:1:3, leaded casements on the upper storey and double-hung sashes with glazing bars on the ground storey. Roof tiled, half hipped at the north and south ends. A C18 addition extends at the rear. old mead

 

Orchard Cottage, WOODEND GREEN - timber-framed and plastered building with Cl8-C19 external features. Two storeys. Casement windows with glazing bars. A gabled porch projects on the front. Roof tiled, with a central chimney stack and one gabled dormer on the front. At the rear there is a weather-boarded addition with a lean-to roof.

orchard cottage
Parsonage Farm Cottage, CHURCH END - C17-C18 timber-framed and plastered building with wings to the south and west. The front has a gable at the north end. There is the remains of pargetted patterns. Two storeys. Modern casement windows. Roof thatched. parsonage farm cottage
Parsonage Farmhouse, CHURCH END - C17 timber-framed and plastered building comprising a 2 storeyed block facing north and east with a lower block of one storey and attics extending to the south at the rear. The north block was altered in the C19. Three window range on the north and east fronts, double-hung sashes with glazing bars. The south wing has casement windows. Roofs tiled, at the rear, with one gabled dormer on the south wing and slate on the front and east side.
parsonage farm

right: Parsonage Farm in 2006
parson age farm 2006
Peddars, WOODEND GREEN - timber-framed and plastered building with Cl8-C19 external features. Renovated in the C20. The east end of the block is 2 storeyed and the remainder is one storey and attics. Small casement windows with glazing bars. Roofs tiled, half hipped at the east and west ends, with 2 modern gabled dormer windows.
Pennington Hall, HENHAM ROAD - C17 timber-framed and plastered house built on an L shaped plan, with C18 alterations and a modern extension to the west wing. Two storeys. The windows are mainly leaded casements (some double-hung sashes with glazing bars). Three window range on the front, with a central doorway. Roof tiled, with end external chimney stacks. The south gable has exposed studding. pennington hall
Pennington Hall Dovecote, HENHAM ROAD - Good example of a C17-C18 dovecote, similar in shape to the dovecote at nearby Elsenham Place. Square on plan. Two storeys. The ground storey is of flint and brick and the upper storey is timber-framed and mainly plastered with modern pargetted panels on the front. The west side is weather-boarded. Roof tiled, pyramidal, with an open cupola with a small pyramidal tiled roof. dovecote pennikngton hall
Pleasant Cottage, WOODEND GREEN, Small C17-C18 timber-framed and plastered building on a T shaped plan. Two storeys. Two window range of casements with glazing bars. The roof of the east block is thatched, half hipped at the east end, and the west block has a tiled roof, half hipped. pleasant cottage
Pledgdon Green Farmhouse, PLEDGDON GREEN - Cl6-C17 timber-framed and plastered house. Two storeys. The upper storey is jettied on the north front on exposed joists and curved brackets with a moulded bressummer. Casement windows, with leaded lights on the north side. Roof tiled, hipped at the east and west ends, with a central chimney stack with attached rectangular shafts. pledgon green farm
Pledgdon Hall, HENHAM ROAD - Timber-framed and plastered house, probably originally a mediaeval hall house on a moated site. Altered and extended in the C17 and later. Renovated in the C20. At the west end there is a cross wing with a jettied upper storey. The centre part has 2 small gables and the east end projects on the front, with a catslide roof and a gabled dormer. The windows are iron casements with glazing bars, probably an early example of Crittalls manufacture. Roof tiled. At the west end there is a large external end chimney stack and the centre block has a central rectangular stack. The interior has heavy close studding exposed at the west end.

Pledgdon Hall Moat at Pledgdon Hall - three sides of a former moat extends to the north of the house and the house is built on the site of the south arm.
pledgdon hall
Pledgdon Hall Barn - Large C17 timber-framed and weather-boarded barn on the west side of the yard, just south of the hall, with an entrance bay on the east side. Roof tiled, half hipped at the south end and on the entrance bay. pledgdon hall barn
Pledgdon Hall - 4546 Object found in a peat deposit during the digging of a reservoir at Pledgdon Hall Farm. Disc manufactured from oak, split radials from parent timber. One side retains the unworked surface of the ray, the other is worked to 'square up' the natural triangular profile of a radial split and subsequently damaged-it is suggested that the ring was originally of regular thickness and oval in shape with an oval perforation. In style and manufacture it is tentatively attributable to any prehistoric period but it is tentatively suggested as belonging to the neolithic or the bronze age. <1> The reservoir where it was found is in a shallow valley. Wooden objects, especially prehistoric, are rare in British archaeology. No parallels are known, so far, in Britain. Possible parallels in Denmark and North Germany, suggested by Veryan Head, among the so-called 'net floats'. One has a radio-carbon date in the 4th millennium bc. The peat is post-Roman so the chances of the disc being prehistoric are much reduced. However, the object resembles stone discs of the late neolithic which may have been net weights. It was not possible to date the object in relation to the peat by pollen analysis alone. <2> Whether of prehistoric or later date, the function of this object is unknown though some connection with fishing and or fowling seems likely in view of the context in which it was found. <3> There are pictures of continental parallels in the SMR. <4> <5> A drawing of the object is in the SMR. <6> Site Assessment = Object conserved in the Lab at the Insititute of Archaeology, London. <2> Unsuitable for C14 dating at the moment owing to its having been treated with polyethylene glycol solution. <3>
Poplar Cottage, CHURCH END - Long timber-framed and plastered building with C18 external features. Two storeys. Six window range, some double-hung sashes with glazing bars and some casements. A number of the casements have leaded lights. Boarded doors. Roof thatched, half hipped at the east and west ends. poplar hall
school cottages school cottages

left & above: School Cottages


Sheepcote Lane 46551 - Cropmarks of a possible rectangular enclosure 42m by 12m, with sharp angular corners (dated 43AD to 409AD) . While there are no internal features or entrances, there are boundary ditches apparently running up to the enclosure. Excavations to the south of the enclosure revealed Roman finds and features
Ship Cottage, THE ROW - C18-C19 timber-framed and plastered building. One storey and attics. Mainly casement windows. Roof thatched, half hipped at the north end. ship cottage
Signpost at Henham Mill Road B1051 junction of road to Brick End 40820. Signpost. 1920s/1930s. Cast iron. Manufactured by Maldon Iron Works. A circular section tapered post with flat semicircular parish plate finial reading PARISH OF / HENHAM with E.C.C. / STICK NO BILLS in centre. Two rectangular 10½ inch arms reading ELSENHAM 1½ STANSTED 3½ / BISHOP’S STORTFORD 7 B1051 (2) BROXTED 1¼ THAXTED 5 / HAVERHILL 18¼ B1951 and 7-inch arm reading PLEDGEON GREEN ¼ / BRICK END ¼. <1> Part of Maldon Iron Works Order No.2404 dated 6/2/1933 for District 1 of Essex County Council.
Signpost at Henham, junction of Old Mead Road and Church Street 40821 - Signpost. 1920s/1930s. Cast iron. Manufactured by Maldon Iron Works. A circular section tapered post with flat semicircular parish plate finial reading PARISH OF / HENHAM with E.C.C. / STICK NO BILLS in centre. Three rectangular 10 ½ inch rectangular arms reading (1) ELSENHAM STATION 1¼ / UGLEY GREEN 2¾ / ELSENHAM 1¾ (2 - repaired) UGLEY CHEQUERS 1¾ / QUENDON 2¾ / NEWPORT 3½ (3) HENHAM ¾ / SIBLEYS 2½ / HAMPERDEN END 3½. <1> Part of Maldon Iron Works Order No.2404 dated 6/2/1933 for District 1 of Essex County Council.
Signpost at Henham, junction of Church Street, High Street & Crow Street 408212 - Signpost. 1920s/1930s. Cast iron. Manufactured by Maldon Iron Works. A circular section tapered post. Semicircular parish plate finial missing. Thre rectangular 10 ½ inch arms reading (1) SIBLEYS 1½ / HAMPERDEN END 2½ / DEBDEN 6¼ (2) ELSENHAM 1¾ / BROXTED 3¼ / STANSTED 3¾ THAXTED 6¾ / BISHOP’S STORTFORD 7 (3) ELSENHAM STN 2 / QUENDON 3¾ / NEWPORT 4½. <1> Part of Maldon Iron Works Order No.2404 dated 6/2/1933 for District 1 of Essex County Council.
Starr Garage Cottage, The Row - Formerly the Star and Garter Inn. C17 timber-framed and plastered building. One storey and attics. Casement windows with glazing bars. Roof thatched, with 2 dormers and a central chimney stack. Starr Garage Cottage
Stone Cottage and Stores, HIGH STREET - Single storeyed building with C19 external features. The stores are timber-framed and plastered and Stone Cottage is faced with flint and brick (painted) and has one modern casement window with lattice leaded lights. The stores has a small C19 shop front. Roofs thatched, half hipped at the east and west ends. Included for the contribution it makes to the character of the street. stone cottage
Suckling Cottage - HENHAM CROW STREET (west side) Pair of Cottages immediately to north of Cedar Cottage TL 5428 44/1257 II 2. C18-C19 timber-framed and plastered building. Two storeys. Two window range of 3-light metal casements with glazing bars. Two gabled porches project on the front. Roofs thatched, half hipped at the north and south ends, with a central chimney stack
suckling cottage suckling cottage

K6 Telephone Kiosk
, CROW STREET - Telephone kiosk. Type K6. Designed 1935 by Sir Giles Gilbert Scott. Made by various contractors. Cast iron. Square kiosk with domed roof. Unperforated crowns to top panels and margin glazing to windows and door.
Telephone and Post box tk
Thatch End, THE ROW - Originally a C15 timber-framed and plastered hall house with a solar wing at the east end. A fireplace and floor was inserted in the C17. Renovated. Casement windows. Roof thatched, with one dormer on the front. At a later date "Thatch End" was joined to "Dolls Cottage" by an infil bay between the main blocks. thtachend
The Bury, HIGH STREET - C16-C17 timber-framed and plastered building with a modern block built on at the east end. The original block is one storey and attics. Casement windows with lattice leaded lights. There is a C17 boarded door with fillets. (Probably inserted from another building.) Roof thatched, with one gabled dormer. The interior has exposed timber-framing, ceiling beams and joists and a large original open fireplace with hearth beam. The modern block is 2 storeyed, with a tiled roof. the bury
The Bury Cottage, HIGH STREET - C18 timber-framed and plastered cottage. One storey and attics. C20 casement windows with leaded lights. Roof thatched, with one dormer window and a central chimney stack, half hipped at the east and west ends. bury cottage

1st July 2011. Bury Cottage, on fire due to an electrical fault. Although part of our daily history, this has been the only time I've hesitated adding a village photograph. It's terrible to witness, worse it's distressing for the family and those, such as Michael Cornell, who can still recall their childhood in this cottage. burycottage1

burycottage2 burycottage3
burycottage1 burycottage5
burycottage6 burycottage7
The Cock Inn, CHURCH END (formerly listed under Church Street) - Timber-framed and plastered building with C18 and later external features. Possibly with an earlier core. Two storeys. Three window range, 3-light casements (C20). Roof tiled, hipped, with a small gable at the south end. cock inn
The Cottage, Plum Tree Cottage and Pear Tree Cottage, WOODEND GREEN - Early C19 brick house, painted. Two storeys. Four window range, partly double-hung sashes with vertical glazing bars and partly casements with glazing bars. Roof tiled, half hipped at the north end, with one central chimney stack. The south gable has weather-boarding. Plum and Pear Tree Cottages
The Manse, CHURCH STREET - C18 timber-framed and plastered building, now faced in pebbledash. The east end is of yellow brick. Two storeys. Three window range of horizontal sliding sashes with glazing bars on the upper storey and double-hung sashes with glazing bars on the ground storey. A central doorway has a wood doorcase with fluted pilasters, pulvinated frieze and cornice. Roof tiled, half hipped at the east and west ends. Two small gabled wings project at the rear and these may be of an earlier date than the main block. the manse
The Old Post Office, CROW STREET Cl8 - C19 timber-framed and plastered building with a modern shop front on the west end and 2 modern bays on the north side. Roof thatched, with a central chimney stack. Included for group value.

olkd post office

The Old Thatched Cottage, CHICKNEY ROAD - C17-C18 timber-framed and plastered cottage. One storey and attics. Casement windows. Roof tiled. The interior has exposed timber-framing, ceiling beams and joists. the old thatched cottage
The White Cottage, CROW STREET - C17 timber-framed and plastered building on an L shaped plan. Weather-boarded on the east end.  Two storeys.  Three window range on the north front and 2 window range on the west front. Modern casements. The north front has a central doorway with a cornice hood. Roof tiled, hipped with small gables,with an external chimney stack at the south end with rectangular shafts. the white cottage
The White Cottage LITTLE HENHAM,C17 timber-framed and plastered cottage with a modern later wing added at the rear. Renovated C20. One storey and attics. Casement windows. Roof thatched, with 2 dormers on the north-west front (one gabled) and one dormer at the rear. the white cottage
The Willows, HIGH STREET - Timber - framed and plastered building originally comprising 2 cottage ranges at right angles to one another joined together by a C19 2 storeyed block. The whole building is now one tenement renovated. The cottage on the south is one storey and attics and has an early frame (possibly mediaeval) exposed on the interior. The east cottage is also one storey and attics and is of the C17-C18. The windows generally are modern casements. Roofs partly thatched and partly tiled. Willows
Village Pump, CROW STREET, approximately 15 m north-west of School Cottages. C19 cast iron pump standing at the north end of the green. school pump
Village Pump, CROW STREET, approximately 35 m west of Glebeside Cottage. C19 cast iron pump standing at the south end of the green. pump near the white house
One of the water pumps in the village. However, this one next to the Cock Public House is a fraud. It was placed as a folly. pump
Waterpump in garden at Church End waterpump at church end
Walnut Tree Cottage and adjoining barn (formerly listed as Yew Tree Cottage and barn adjoining Yew Tree Cottage, under Church Street) CHICKNEY ROAD - C17 timber-framed and plastered cottage with a barn adjoining on the south end. The cottage is one storey and attics. Small casement windows with leaded lights. Roof thatched, with one dormer window on the east side. The barn has an entrance doorway on the west side. The cottage has exposed ceiling beams and joists on the interior. walnut tree cottage
Woodend, WOODEND GREEN - C17-C18 timber-framed and plastered house.  One storey and attics.  Casement windows.  Roof thatched, half hipped at the west end, with 2 dormer windows on the north side.  The interior has exposed ceiling beams and joists and some exposed framing.
Woodend Cottage, WOODEND GREEN - C17-C18 timber-framed and plastered building. Two storeys. Casement windows (C20). Roof thatched, half hipped at the west end, with a central and end chimney stack. woodend
Woodend Green Cottages, WOODEND GREEN - Timber-framed and plastered house with early C19 and later external features. Built on an L shaped plan. Two storeys. Casement windows with moulded stucco square hood moulds. The south and east fronts each have 2 window range and a central gabled porch. Roofs tiled, with one central and one end chimney stack. woodend green cottages
Wyndies, CROW STREET - Early C17 timber-framed and plastered building with later alterations and additions. Two storeys. The timber-framing is exposed on the south front and at the east end of the north front. At the east end of the north and south fronts the upper storeys is jettied on exposed joists. There are some old leaded casements. The jettied upper storey on the south front has an oriel bay window with leaded casements. Roof tiled, with a small gable at the east end and a tall central chimney stack with attached shafts and a tall external stack at the east side.
gill turner vsm
wyndies
Yarrow Cottage, HIGH STREET - C18 timber-framed and plastered house. Two storeys. Three window range, iron casements with glazing bars. Roof thatched, half hipped at the east and west ends, with a central chimney stack. yarrow cottage
Yew Tree Cottage 36130 - TIMBER FRAMED HOUSE (Dated 1700AD to 1799AD) yew tree cottage
East of Ugley Hall Farm - SMR 7279 name not given - cropmarks of linear features, probably trackways. (There are a number of crop markings identified in 1946 aerial photographs of Henham)
Henham Reservoir 9960 - a rescue excavation was undertaken on a holding pond for fish near to Henham Hall. A depth of c. 0.3m of sub soil had also been removed consequently with the loss of shallow features. A sequence of pits, ditches, post holes and gullies were identified. Metal detecting found coins with a date range from 260 - 340 AD, whilst the stratified pottery dated to the fourth century AD. There was a quantity of second century pottery although this was mainly unstratified.
West of Henham Lodge 18897 - cropmarks of field boundaries and extraction pit
West of Henham 4658 Roman site-enclosure? In VCH NGR is TL 539284. Southernmost of 2 large fields 600yds west of the farm yields black earth and potsherds in deep ploughing. There are indications of 3 sides of a large rectangular enclosure c370ft long from east to west. Dated 43AD to 409AD. POTTERY VESSEL (Dated 43AD To 409AD)
East of Elsenham 18898- cropmarks of field boundaries.
9871 Metal detectorists finds to the south west of Henham. 11 Roman coins mainly C3-C4. These have been catalogued at Hertfordshire Museum. One C2 brooch.